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Analysis / Business

2018 Developer Conferences: A Changing Landscape In Developer Relations

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Every year, software developers eagerly look forward to annual conferences where they can meet up with other techies with whom they may have worked with on any number of open-source projects. Like any other industry, there is always a theme or common thread trending, and this year that theme appears to be a focus on how the landscape of developing software and apps is changing.

A Decade Of Changes

In what was once a rather homogenous market of PCs, developers now must address issues across multiple platforms and devices. Software development companies must face the fact that today’s consumer may use multiple devices across all devices, platforms and operating systems. The focus of the two major developer conferences of the summer will take a long look at how developers are now approaching such challenges as addressing the variables in how users access the Internet and how they store files. With so many toolkits and languages available, these conferences help to keep developers up to date on the latest tools and trends.

Conferences Highlighted In 2018

One of the year’s main conferences has come and gone in February, but the ITERATE Conference held on the 27th of February in San Francisco served to highlight what developers can look forward to in October at the Monktoberfest Conference to be held in Portland, Maine. Much of what will be addressed surrounds the challenges of developing apps for Cloud computing which must, by their very nature, be accessible from literally any device running on any platform. While the biggies are Microsoft, Apple, Google and even Amazon, cross-platform apps are presenting one of the biggest challenges developers have ever faced. Once there was Microsoft and Apple and now there are many. Of course, let’s not forget the contribution IBM made to the realm of computer land. The conference also sparks interest among smaller companies, who will participate for the first time, like Elinext. The combination of small and big companies is ideal for developers.

The Importance Of Attending Developer Conferences

The reason why these conferences have become so important to software developers around the world is because there is also a social aspect to the events. Not only are new products showcased but keynote speakers are chosen to outline trends within the industry. This is the one time in which developers can get that face-to-face with other professionals in the industry and often those little tidbits of shared information can set the stage for a whole new approach to apps they are currently working on. In fact, this is where many developers meet up with new faces they eventually will collaborate with online for new projects that they hope will take the world of computing by storm. That is really every developer’s dream, after all.

In the end, these conferences of 2018 also highlight the need for sustainability. Not only are developers seeking greener solutions, but they are looking for ways to sustain the rapid pace of keeping up with the ever-changing needs of consumers without hitting that stage of total burnout. It is best said by how the ITERATE Conference was divided. The first portion of the conference was focused on API development and design while the final part of the conference addressed developer burnout. Even if you didn’t attend an earlier conference, there are several upcoming events to consider. Check out Monktoberfest in early October to get your tickets secured in advance. If you are interested in any other conferences, you can find a list here.

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Christian Harris is editor and publisher of BCW. Christian has over 20 years’ publishing experience and in that time has contributed to most major IT magazines and Web sites in the UK. He launched BCW in 2009 as he felt there was a need for honest and personal commentary on a wide range of business computing issues. Christian has a BA (Hons) in Publishing from the London College of Communication.