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Mark Homer is Vice President Global Customer Transformation at ServiceMax from GE Digital, where he focuses on working with prospects and existing customers to understand and unlock the true value of their field service organisations. Mark is known as a dynamic innovative and highly successful IT and digital sector director with technological vision, commercial acumen and an outstanding record for driving sales, partner channels and business development. With twenty five years in the software and technology industry of which the last ten have been focused on the global service sector. Prior to joining ServiceMax, Mark was the Chief Operating Officer at Service Power Business Solutions (SVR). In this role he headed software development across offshore partners and agile development teams over three time zones. He spearheaded technological strategic vision, product development for Service Power scheduling, optimisation and field service operations and led the digital strategy for M2M and IoT connected services. Earlier in his career, Mark served as a board director at John Matchett Limited and at the Matchett Group which included Adkins, Matchett and Toy Inc, he launched Registrar (acquired by Pathlore, then later by SumTotal Inc) and Skillscape (acquired by SkillSoft Inc) in Europe. Later he was regional director of business development at Outstart (EMEA) Limited. Mark was educated at Oxford Brookes University and was one of the first Fellows of the Institute of IT Training.

Service Is Turning On Its Axis As Businesses Gravitate To Intelligent Data

Spare a thought for the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service. Reports recently revealed that it faced a £389m backlog in vehicle and property repair costs. It’s a typical example of how organisations can get bogged down in service if they do not adopt an automated, service-centric approach to business. Through the automatic collection and analysis of service data from vehicles, buildings and machines, it’s possible to turn this on its head. Service can actually save costs and not be the subject of auditing story headlines. In fact, asset and service data holds all sorts of insights for companies that extend far beyond service operations. It can also give a 14 percent boost in revenue for businesses by not only reducing service costs, but also providing intelligent data that can help so many ot...

Mind The Gap: Digital Transformation Tackles Unplanned Downtime

Although businesses have always had to tolerate periods of unplanned downtime, historically, companies have just had to endure the pain, and try and stay on top of equipment maintenance and service requirements in the hope they can minimise such instances. But all that’s changing. The shift to outcome-based business models, equipment assets becoming more sophisticated and. connected, and of course, the pervasive and increasing reliance on machines, are all adding to the pressure to avoid outages – making unplanned downtime a strategic issue. As asset equipment estates continue to proliferate, it’s becoming increasingly harder to monitor and address downtime. And as digital transformation sweeps across organisations and customer expectations continue to rise, businesses simply can’t afford ...

Risk Or Revolution: Rise Of The Machines

While the steel industry comes to terms with Tata Steel’s decision to quit the UK, it’s a stark reminder of the fragility of jobs particularly in traditional industries. Add steelmaker to coal miner, milkman, and switchboard operator. Change has always been rooted in technology and shifting global economies, and we are now on the verge of a new revolution. Like most other revolutions before it, the proliferation of connected sensors on everything from televisions to turbines will create further change to jobs, increasing redundancies but also creating new roles and skills. This internet of things (IoT) is not short on publicity and with good reason. The numbers are somewhat mind blowing. Research analyst Gartner has claimed that 6.4 billion connected things will be in use this year, an inc...

Why History Will Shine A ‘Brilliant’ Light On Modern Industrialisation

It was the year Marilyn Monroe died and John Glenn became the first American to orbit the earth. The year 1962 was a standout year, not because of the Cuban missile crisis or The Beatles releasing their first single Love Me Do, but because of something much less glamourous but hugely significant to modern industry and living. In a General Motors factory in West Trenton, New Jersey, UNIMATE, the world’s first industrial robot went online, performing spot welding and die castings. It was a moment of history, something which would ultimately change the face of manufacturing forever. Today automation of some kind in factories is expected, at least among the larger manufacturers. Making anything on a grand scale demands it and businesses are increasingly attuned to the potential benefits. Three...