Jeff Bradshaw

Jeff Bradshaw is chief technology officer at Adaptris. Jeff is responsible for the overall technical leadership of the company. He sets the development roadmap, and works with the Chief Architect to deliver innovative software that the "field" organisation can take to market. Jeff also works with the operations team to ensure that the solutions deployed within the company's four data centres are always available. In addition to this, he liaises with customers, to ensure that solutions exceed their requirements, and grow with their business. Jeff has spent his working life in the B2B arena. Prior to forming Adaptris, Jeff worked with EDI and EAI industry leaders Perwill and Frontec (Axway) and end user organisations DHL, and Equitas. Jeff has been engaged as a consultant with many large partners including Progress and customers including British Airways, Scottish Widows, British Telecommunications, and Carrefour.

Technology Doesn’t Kill Projects, People Do

Having recently read a Forrester whitepaper regarding integration trends, I am inclined to agree with their findings. Most of the larger companies I work with have multiple “middleware” tools from multiple vendors, all solving problems in their own way. Generally integration technology is the plumbing of the business, it’s not something that often gets changed, it is put in to so...

SOA’s Martini Moment: Anytime, Any-Place, Anywhere

If SOA is back, as many have been arguing in recent months, then it’s different now – it comes with more flexibility and choice than before and it’s not just the preserve of the big corporate; this time around it’s not one size fits all, but it’s for everyone. Let’s take a concrete, real-world example, which we come across all the time. If you’re working in a small IT department that finds it has ...

SOA Is Back, And Here’s Why

All this talk about the return of SOA and its continuing importance to IT architectures of the future comes as no surprise. I’ve been arguing for a long time that the best way to architect integration is by building on a common open standards-based adapter framework. Yes, the type of commentary that is coming out of the likes of Gartner’s Symposium last month makes a lot of sense. Organisati...

Big Data And The Supply Chain

With all the talk about big data in so many different contexts, one area that’s been somewhat overlooked is the supply chain, yet it’s one of the biggest producers and consumers of data. Just think of all those purchase orders, invoices, confirmations and delivery notes swilling around customers’ and suppliers’ systems, and you can see how big the data challenge is. But the prize from making sense...

7 Steps To Cloud Heaven

There are many reasons for moving IT services to the cloud – predictability of service, optimisation of IT resource and so on (I won’t list them all here). But on top of the usual arguments for cloud services, there are a number of compelling arguments why B2B integration is particularly well suited to cloud delivery. Here, in no particular order, are seven of the best: 1. Modernisation of the IT ...

Destination: Integration

Integration-as-a-service may be one of the last areas where service providers have taken to the cloud, but there are a whole host of reasons why it’s particularly well suited for cloud-based delivery. Data integration is a discipline that’s historically been neglected in IT projects, almost coming as an afterthought, and in traditional supply chains and EDI, it has left smaller players less well e...

Why Traditional EAI Adapters Fail

Many years spent building integration solutions have taught me a great deal about what makes certain approaches successful. During this time, I’ve observed many projects where traditional EAI (Enterprise Application Integration) adapters were used to connect IT assets to the integration infrastructure. The recurring feature in all of these projects is the staggering amount of legacy code that need...