Businesses Hang-Up On Employee Mobile App Access

Independent research commissioned by Ping Identity has revealed enterprises are restricting employee access to vital work applications due to security and control fears.

Employees were found to use an average of five work applications every day, but nearly a third (27%) claimed they were not granted access to these applications via their mobile devices. Many said they could gain access to some of these critical work apps (61%) however, only 3% could seamlessly work from their mobile device as if in the office, accessing all applications.

Finance applications topped the list of restricted programmes (42%) with access to business applications (38%) and partner applications (13%) also being stated as limited.

In addition, over half of respondents (53%) claimed that security was the reason for restricting employee access to certain applications, whereas nearly a quarter (22%) viewed ubiquitous application access as a major management issue.

Acknowledging the need to create a seamless environment for staff to work, a third of enterprises have enabled employee access to internal and external applications with the same log-in details.

“As workforces become ever-more mobile, business applications increasingly extend beyond the realms of on-premise and into the cloud. Security measures must therefore start with an individual’s identity, not the application they’re accessing, or device they’re using. Granting staff seamless access to critical applications both within and outside the business, and managing these connections closely, is essential to ensuring continued business success in extremely competitive times.”

Christian Harris is editor and publisher of BCW. Christian has over 20 years' publishing experience and in that time has contributed to most major IT magazines and Web sites in the UK. He launched BCW in 2009 as he felt there was a need for honest and personal commentary on a wide range of business computing issues. Christian has a BA (Hons) in Publishing from the London College of Communication.