Development Testing: A New Dimension In Software Quality

Software Testing

The relentless pursuit of new product innovation and faster time to market appears to be common across all industry sectors. Technological change is now so rapid that companies will use every legitimate means available to gain competitive advantage. And software is at the very heart of this innovation and reduced time to market.

This puts a lot of pressure on software developers to deliver a quality product as expeditiously as possible. This isn’t an easy task, especially when you consider how many lines of software code are present in both electronic products and software applications.

Take for example a recently launched commercial aircraft that requires at least 6.5 million lines of code to operate its avionics and onboard support systems. This sounds like a lot of code -and it certainly is- but it’s just a drop in the ocean compared to what it takes to run a luxury car. Today, software in cars, planes and other everyday necessities has only grown both in amount and complexity.

With such a staggering amount of software code, developers have a key role to play in delivering quality products and applications out to market. Faster.

A commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting confirmed the trend, that we are seeing with customers. The market demand for speed and innovation is changing the face of quality with developers taking more of the load.

Forrester surveyed 258 IT decision makers in organisations that develop software in North America and Europe. Over 59% said they we under more stress or significantly more pressure to deliver innovation today than they were two years ago. And 58% said they felt more pressure to deliver faster time to market.

Speed is everything in today’s market and over 70% of respondents said they have an increased awareness of the time- savings of finding and fixing defect early in the lifecycle.

This realisation is changing the face of quality. The Forrester survey found that 97% of respondents plan to increase their investment in development testing. Product quality, improved product security, and cost reduction as the top three items driving their development testing initiatives. Time is money and money is money. According to 73% of people surveyed, cost is the biggest impact of finding late defects.

Am I surprised by the results? Yes and no. I am surprised by number of people that plan to increase their development testing investments. But it also makes sense. Just recently one of our new customers confessed that they used to have a flawed quality strategy.

They would put all of their time and energy into staffing up in QA instead of investing in tools and training up front to let developers develop better code. They’ve now shifted some of those resources into development and are enabling their teams to find and fix their defects right from their desktop where defects are cheapest and fastest to fix.

More and more companies are following this approach. They all know that there is just too little time to waste when it comes to rolling out their services. Its better therefore, to get the development testing right the first time, so there are no problems down the line.

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Chris Adlard is the EMEA Marketing Director at Coverity. He is responsible for all aspects of marketing and communications across EMEA. Chris brings a wealth of B2B technology marketing and communications experience to his role. This includes strategy development, marketing and communications campaign execution, product marketing and enterprise customer relationship management. Before joining Coverity in 2010, Chris spent the first 7 years of his professional career at IBM’s EMEA marketing group, first in the PC Division, then in the Global sectors and solutions business. Chris eventually became the marketing and communications lead for the IBM/SAP alliance. After his successful stint at IBM, Chris moved to Netegrity, taking on the role of marketing and communications manager for Germany. After Netegrity’s subsequent acquisition by CA, he spent 5 years working for CA UK as Enterprise Customer Alliance Manager. In addition to extensive enterprise marketing and communications at larger organisations, Chris has carried out consultancy projects for smaller organisations and start-ups.

  • austin

    .
    The decision of implementing a standard for testing in software development
    does not ensure that it provides a foolproof solution because as any process
    requires not only learn, and know it is necessary that it be adopted as a way
    of working across the organization or area involved in software development.