Eco vandalism: businesses pay up to ten times too much for bulk printing

A study by DASCOM GB castigates the cost and ecological damage of laser printers. The pitch isn’t surprising considering DASCOM GB manufacturers dot matrix and thermal printers under the TallyGenicom brand, but the study does reveal some interesting facts considering the increased attention to economic and eco-linked costs within businesses.

The study reveals that dot matrix printing remains 90% cheaper per copy than mono laser printing over a typical 5-year period of use. This finding is significant as laser printing is increasingly used unnecessarily for bulk printing of items such as stock reports, invoices, receipts and waybills, typically landing users with over £10,000 of extra lifetime costs per machine (based on a typical back-office load of 10,000 pages per month).

DASCOM GB claims the study was conducted using an up-to-date, “market leading”, high-speed (33ppm) business mono laser printer, typically used for the routine printing of bulk documents. Its performance was compared to that of the company’s corresponding dot matrix machine, the DASCOM T2265+. Printing 600,000 pages over a 5-year period, the DASCOM machine’s total cost, including consumables and print heads, worked out at a tenth of the cost per page of the laser mono device. The study did not take into account the far longer lifetime of the dot matrix machine.

“UK business has an expensive addiction to laser printing, and it’s got to kick the habit,” said DASCOM GB’s Managing Director Robin Edwardes. “Why get a Ferrari to do a Land Rover’s job? It’s about choosing the right tool. In the UK, most back-office printing fulfils routine, but mission critical jobs. The costs of this printing are massive and underappreciated: they can and should be cut. It’s both unnecessary and an act of eco vandalism to keep throwing money at a profligate print model that relies on hugely overpriced consumables.”

Christian Harris is editor and publisher of BCW. Christian has over 20 years' publishing experience and in that time has contributed to most major IT magazines and Web sites in the UK. He launched BCW in 2009 as he felt there was a need for honest and personal commentary on a wide range of business computing issues. Christian has a BA (Hons) in Publishing from the London College of Communication.

  • I agree with you, Eco-vandalism. do not waste paper and energy for any office. make sure you have checked your file before printing it.