Google’s delisting of co.cc sites is great, but more sub-domains need chopping

Reports that Google has quietly delisted the co.cc sub-domain from its main search engine should be applauded, but the privileged identity management specialist’s President, there are many other `iffy’ sub-domains that could also do with the Google chop.

Co.cc is one of the relatively new generation of sub-domains assigned to a company, which has offered free domain registrations for several years. Predictably, this has resulted in large volumes of spammers and other low grade registrants flocking to its doors.

But co.cc is only one of several `spammy’ domain name groups that are causing problems for Internet users. The big question is whether Google – now that it has the accolade of being both a company name and a verb has the chutzpah to ban other sub-domains that generate vast volumes of electronic garbage on the Internet.

The open nature of the Internet naming convention means that there are main other dark little corners of the Web where less than savoury activities go on.

The big question is whether Google, given its dominant position in the search engine stakes, has the foresight to set the pace and start removing scummy Internet sub-domains from its search engine system, at least until the sub-domain operators can offer some sort of security to their Web surfers.

Corporate behemoths the size of Google need to assume the mantle of trend setters in the online world, simply because of their sheer dominance of the marketplace.

Other behemoths such as IBM and Microsoft have their positive sides, so it’s good to see Google abiding by its corporate philosophy of `don’t be evil’ and removing co.cc from its search engine.

Just because a company has acquired the rights to the a given dub-domain does not give it a right to be on the mainstream search engines. The delisting of co.cc is a step in the right direction by Google and I applaud that move.

The next step will be for Google to take action on the many other sub-domains that should not be listed in its search directory.

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Philip Lieberman, the founder and president of Lieberman Software, has more than 30 years of experience in the software industry. In addition to his proficiency as a software engineer, Philip is an astute entrepreneur able to perceive shortcomings in existing products on the market, and fill those gaps with innovative solutions. He developed the first products for the privileged identity management space, and continues to introduce new solutions to resolve the security threat of privileged account credentials. Philip has published numerous books and articles on computer science, has taught at UCLA, and has authored many computer science courses for Learning Tree International. Philip has a B.A. from San Francisco State University.