HTML5 Is Key To A MAD World

Mobile Strategy

According to researchers, over 5 billion devices connect to the Internet today and by 2020 over 22 billion devices including 6 billion phones, 2 billion TVs will be connected. By 2014 sales of new internet connected devices excluding PC’s will be over 500 million units a year.

We’re moving into a connected world where people expect internet access any time, any place and on anything, and so many of us will have Multiple Access Devices (MAD).

Therefore it still amazes me to find large corporate with a separate Internet strategy and mobile strategy. I won’t name and shame but you know who you are! What next, a strategy for tablets and a separate one for Internet TVs?

One of the key principles of HTML5 is that it aims to give you the tools to write once, deploy everywhere; that is, to create applications and content that can be developed to run appropriately for every device. Of course where it makes sense an application might need to take advantage of a specific devices capability (e.g. a camera or GPS), but even then conditional behaviour can be developed to provide such differentiation rather than develop a whole new application for a specific devices.

One of the key enablers here is adopting an approach whereby the content/application VIEW (look and feel) is fully controlled by CSS, and namely version 3. CSS3 has a number of features that allow you to control layout and look and feel according to screen dimensions/estate. The enabling technology is Media Queries, which allow you to create different VIEWS of an application based on screen dimensions. I’ll be writing more about this soon.

Creating a MAD strategy is not all about technology though. Organisations will have to monitor and sometimes drive changes in customer behaviour, look at how much more time youth spend on smartphones than watching TV or in fact any other device.

With each person having multiple access devices, different devices will likely to be used specifically for different parts of the customer buying cycle. If a purchase requires research and thought then most likely this will be done on PC’s/Laptops, for instant updates (news, stock prices, weather, scores and so on) smartphones for entertainment maybe tablets will prevail.

There are many more challenges to be discussed and I hope to cover these in more depth in follow up blogs, but for now small or large organisations need to create a single MAD strategy that encompasses customer/user needs, monitor behavioural changes and trends and investigate the capabilities of enabling technologies.

The change will be profound, as organisations realise the total impact to processes, skills and technologies to really master Customer Experience in a MAD world, a journey which the visionaries have already started.

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Dharmesh Mistry is the CTO/COO of Edge IPK, a leading provider of front-end Web solutions. Within his blog, “Facing up to IT”, Dharmesh considers a number of technology issues, ranging from Web 2.0, SOA and Mobile platforms, and how these impact upon business. Having launched some of the very first online financial services in 1997, and since then delivering online solutions to over 30 FS organisations and pioneering Single Customer View (Lloyds Bank, 1989) and Multi Channel FS (Demonstrated in Tomorrow’s World in 99), Dharmesh can be considered a true veteran of both the Financial Services and Technology industries.