HTML5: Microsoft Wakes Up To Smell The Coffee

Another month, another confusing set of stories relating to Microsoft’s web framework Silverlight and the next generation mark-up language HTML5.

I wrote about the relationship previously, referring to Internet Explorer general manager Dean Hachamovitch’s suggestion that the future of the web is HTML5. More specifically, I questioned whether Microsoft’s support for HTML5 left Silverlight out in the cloud.

The answer for a few weeks, at least according to the team in Redmond, was at the centre of the next generation web. In a blog posting, Microsoft’s director of product management for developer platforms Brad Becker stated that Microsoft remained committed to Silverlight – and that the framework extends the web by enabling scenarios that HTML does not cover.

That comment, in itself, was not surprising. HTML5 remains a work in progress, with developments on various platforms continuing to be developed. Silverlight, as Becker states in his own posting, is already installed on 600,000,000 desktops and devices.

But success is not just about numbers. Take the related area of mobile operating systems, where Symbian remains the leading mobile OS with about 40% of the market, according to analyst Gartner.

Those figures, however, include the legacy of Nokia’s previous success. The smart phone market is leading to the ever-increasing growth – and inevitably the dominance – of Research in Motion, Apple and Android.

The same will be true in web development. Do not assume people will use a specific platform just because a provider has a ready-made user base. More to the point, Microsoft seems to be coming round to that way of thinking.

Bob Muglia, Microsoft’s head of servers and tools division, gave an interview at the company’s Professional Developers Conference and said that Silverlight was still “core” to Microsoft but the company was looking to other technologies to allow people to access online services.

Muglia attempted to cool the situation in a blog posting, suggesting his comment that the company’s Silverlight strategy had shifted was simply a comment on how the industry had changed. It was a suggestion that, rather then cool the situation, helped to add petrol to an already well-stoked fire.

Developers rounded on Muglia, posting comments on his blog which suggested they felt hurt and that Silverlight’s reputation had been left damaged: “The effort needed to restore our confidence in Silverlight is tantamount to unringing a bell,” suggested one poster.

HTML5 is a work in progress, but its progress is also startling. Non-believers – even at Microsoft’s Redmond HQ – are beginning to wake up and smell the coffee. Confusion reigns but sense, and HTML5, will win out in the end. Now somebody needs to pass the coffee cup to Adobe!

Dharmesh Mistry is the CTO/COO of Edge IPK, a leading provider of front-end Web solutions. Within his blog, “Facing up to IT”, Dharmesh considers a number of technology issues, ranging from Web 2.0, SOA and Mobile platforms, and how these impact upon business. Having launched some of the very first online financial services in 1997, and since then delivering online solutions to over 30 FS organisations and pioneering Single Customer View (Lloyds Bank, 1989) and Multi Channel FS (Demonstrated in Tomorrow’s World in 99), Dharmesh can be considered a true veteran of both the Financial Services and Technology industries.