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Logitech Comfort Lapdesk

Using a laptop can give you neck ache in a hurry and burn a hole right through your thighs. To address these pain points, Logitech’s Comfort Lapdesk (£26.99/$39.99) is the newest addition to the company’s line of laptop accessories. The Comfort Lapdesk provides a stable base and helps protect against laptop heat whether you’re working from the comfort of your sofa, relaxing in your bed or reclining on the living-room floor. It looks great, though white is a bitch to keep clean and there is no mousing area. And its curvaceous bottom makes it look like it would be better suited as a breast desk, or at the very least a butt desk.

If there was ever a product that looks like it was designed by Apple, but actually had nothing to do with the Cupertino-based company, this is it. Logitech’s Comfort Lapdesk is sublimely manufactured and is finished in an eye-catching glossy white plastic finish that more than suits an iPod and MacBook (PC laptops are also supported). The underside houses the actual material base (air-mesh fabric made out of polyester and polyurethane), which is both comfortable and reassuring – even when used with a back-breaking 17-inch laptop.

While other lapdesks promise improved comfort, they often fall short because of poor design and low-quality materials. Logitech’s Comfort LapDesk has a thoughtful design that makes your laptop experience more comfortable whenever you use your mobile computer on your lap – such as on the sofa in front of the TV or in bed. Logitech said that its own research revealed that nearly 60% of people who use a laptop at home use it on the sofa so they can be with their families while browsing the Web, e-mailing or chatting. In addition, the research showed that 36% use a laptop on the bed and 16% use it while sitting or lying on the floor. However, nearly 50% of those people report concerns about laptop heat and 41% raise concerns about posture. Most people use a pillow or book in an attempt to provide a barrier to the heat emitted from the laptop, but those solutions often end up trapping heat, making it even hotter.

Unlike makeshift solutions and other lapdesks, the Comfort Lapdesk features a four-layer, heat-shielding design. The bottom-layer’s fabric and an air-flow chamber between the Lapdesk’s base and top combine to further minimise heat. Plus, instead of the whole laptop lying flat against your body, the arched base makes contact with your legs in just four places, improving air flow. To provide a stable foundation for comfortable laptop use, the cushioned base allows you to relax your legs instead of locking your knees together to support your computer. In addition, a non-slip glossy finish on the top of the Lapdesk helps prevent your system from sliding around. And a 12-degree angled riser positions your laptop to a height that supports neck and leg comfort (when used in a seated position).

When you’re done using the computer, the Comfort Lapdesk’s non-collapsible design doesn’t exactly make for easy storage, but you should be able to slide it under a sofa or bed. Alternatively it can stand upright, should you have a crafty space to hide it out of sight. Overall the Comfort Lapdesk is one of the highest-quality laptop desks we’ve seen. Sure it’s small on functionality, but it looks fabulous and does the job just fine. Our biggest gripes are that it’s a dust magnet, you only have to look at the glossy white finish and it scratches, and the non-adjustable angled riser means you might never get the perfect computing position without angling your legs – thus chucking ergonomics out of the window! For the price, however, it could be just the ticket for casual computing around your home.

Reviewed By Christian Harris

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Christian Harris is editor and publisher of BCW. Christian has over 20 years’ publishing experience and in that time has contributed to most major IT magazines and Web sites in the UK. He launched BCW in 2009 as he felt there was a need for honest and personal commentary on a wide range of business computing issues. Christian has a BA (Hons) in Publishing from the London College of Communication.