Need ISP-Free Email But Paranoid About GMail? Give GMX A Try

If you are paranoid about anything Google and refuse to use Gmail but want an ISP/host free email service why not take GMX for a test drive? Like Gmail, GMX offers the choice of POP or IMAP retrieval and you can nominate all your other email addresses on Hotmail, Yahoo, etc to be picked up by GMX.

Sign up is a breeze and you can check if your preferred user name has already been taken and GMX offers a wide choice of free addresses, ensuring you get the one you want. Choose from e.g.: @gmx.com, @gmx.us or @gmx.co.uk as well as @gmx.fr, @gmx.it, @gmx.pt, @gmx.ph, @gmx.com.my, @gmx.sg, @gmx.es, @gmx.hk and many more.

GMX offers high level spam filters and all GMX accounts are hosted on high security data centres with “redundant systems.” This means that your e-mail and storage data are secured on several different backup systems so if there is an outage for whatever reason on one server, your data is secured on another.

GMX doesn’t have the same seemingly endless email storage that Gmail boasts but it offers 5gb of online storage for email with an extra 2gb of storage for files such as attachments. and as everything goes through SSL your information is secure.

I set up a test account and send and retrieve is as fast as Gmail and if you have an questions or problems, there’s an online interactive forum available.

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Kevin Tea is a journalist and marketing communications professional who has worked for some of the leading blue chip companies in the UK and Europe. In the 1990s he became interested in how emerging Internet-based technologies could change the way that people worked and became an administrator on the Telework Europa Forum on CompuServe. With other colleagues he took part in a four year European Commission sponsored project to look at the way that the Internet could benefit remote communities. His blog is a resource for SMEs who want to use cloud computing and Web 2.0 technologies.