The Cloud Doesn’t Suck, It’s Suckling

Apple’s Steve Wozniak’s ears must be burning after publically saying that the cloud sucked because some of his Google Calendars went AWOL. In a post written for Gizmodo Wozniak wrote: “Not long after upgrading to Mountain Lion, one of my three primary Google calendars disappeared. It no longer existed.

“I have multiple Google calendars and some people have read ability while others can create events but I have the sole admin account that could have deleted a calendar. I would never do this, and checked to make sure it’s not easy. In fact, a dialog appears telling you to ok that you will lose all your events. I would never do this.”

Memo to Woz: shut the **** up!

Now I don’t know about you but if I were a bean counter at Apple I’d be wishing that Wozniak would “shut the **** up” not least because of the company’s fledgling service iCloud could be damaged by the criticism of its own maker, so to speak.

Wozniak compounds the problem when speaking in Washington when he expressed his worries about the cloud, saying, “I think it’s going to be horrendous.” Then he comes out and says it—the surprisingly uninformed opinion that the cloud equals loss of control: “I want to feel that I own things. . . . The more we transfer everything onto the web, onto the cloud, the less we’re going to have control over it.”

Apple upgrade caused the problem

To be honest I am slightly amazed at this attitude. Here we have a guy that has been at the cutting edge of technology for god knows how long and he is criticising a dynamic innovation that is only just out of nappies (diapers). OK, it’s a PITA to lose some data but frankly if you don’t have a belt and braces approach to securing your data in a nascent technology then you are an idiot.

It appears that his disappearing Google Calendars had nothing to do with Google (“Some zealous Google employee might have been looking at my calendars (I wouldn’t mind) and accidentally deleted one” – come on!) but an upgrade in Apple’s own Mountain Lion that was incompatible with his BusyCal account.

Cloud computing is in its early stages and is growing faster, maybe too fast as it tries to run before it can walk, but that’s no excuse for the adventurous mind to back off and try and hide from any malodorous solids that his rotating blades. Beaten paths are for beaten men and it’s living life out there on the edge that gives it some sharpness. If you cannot hack that then regardless of what your past has been maybe it’s time for your pipe and slippers.

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Kevin Tea is a journalist and marketing communications professional who has worked for some of the leading blue chip companies in the UK and Europe. In the 1990s he became interested in how emerging Internet-based technologies could change the way that people worked and became an administrator on the Telework Europa Forum on CompuServe. With other colleagues he took part in a four year European Commission sponsored project to look at the way that the Internet could benefit remote communities. His blog is a resource for SMEs who want to use cloud computing and Web 2.0 technologies.