What A Brite Idea! Event Organisation Hits The Cloud

Earlier this year my eyes were opened to the world of online event registrations and event planning websites. My first encounter was with DoAttend, which has served me extremely well over the last couple of months, but I have discovered that its easy to use functionality and sleek and simple design masks a slight lack in flexibility.

I started to look at EventBrite as an alternative option. At first glimpse it looks a little like a fresh faced and funky social networking site offering you to attend a number of hip and happening parties, but once you have found the set up your own event button you are up and running.

The next barrier that becomes immediately obvious is how to go about “de-Yankifying” the programme – but (with a little concentration) it all becomes self explanatory.

EventBrite’s major benefit is its easy navigation and the flow of the site. All the main stages and steps for setting up an event are all on the one page and so no need to dilly dally back and forth – making it clean and straight forward to operate. It is also feature rich with easy integration into social networking sites, as well as the ability to set up affiliate website sponsorship.

The main problem I encountered when using DoAttend was when I tried promoting an online webinar. With EventBrite, you can remove or add a Google map which is great for events with a physical location, but when promoting a webinar a map is not necessary. The option to remove maps is a benefit which is currently unavailable through the DoAttend offering. You can also adapt the wording and look of the electronic ticket, to remove wording such as ‘Bring this ticket along to the event with you’ which once again is currently not available on DoAttend.

Flexibility At A Price

The flexibility of EventBrite, comes at a price, however. The ability to customise colour schemes, fonts and style can present challenges to the less artistic among us. Therefore it took me twice as long to set up an event – as I got a little distracted playing around with these features. But with time and persistence I found it is possible to produce a polished and tailored look.

It is also amazing how much delight and pleasure came over me when I saw the little initials – FAQ – this is a huge tick in the EventBrite box. With DoAttend, should you have a question you have to complete and email a form to them, and admittedly you do get a personalised response, but so many of these questions could have been answered quicker with a basic FAQ page.

To sum up, both of these sites offer a great option for anyone looking to promote an event, but to be aware of the limitations of each before starting out. The award for speed, simplicity and sleek design has to be awarded to DoAttend whilst the award for flexibility, functionality and funky final results is won by EventBrite.

Kevin Tea is a journalist and marketing communications professional who has worked for some of the leading blue chip companies in the UK and Europe. In the 1990s he became interested in how emerging Internet-based technologies could change the way that people worked and became an administrator on the Telework Europa Forum on CompuServe. With other colleagues he took part in a four year European Commission sponsored project to look at the way that the Internet could benefit remote communities. His blog is a resource for SMEs who want to use cloud computing and Web 2.0 technologies.

  • Both Eventbrite and DoAttend are sleek and simple, in my opinion. TicketPeak (an application provided by my company) provides much of the functionality required for ticketed events, but at a very low cost – £0.19 per ticket.

  • Try http://buzzaroundme.com. The tool helps to discover events of your interest happening in your neighborhood and city

  • Hey guys. Have you considered http://www.tickettailor.com ? It’s a fully featured ticketing platform without the per-ticket fees.