With HP gone, who’s going to mop up the business mobile marketplace?

With the recent news that HP is pulling out of the mobile device marketplace and most of the major players are entrenched in a battle for supremecy for integration with social media, search domination and apps to keep us amused is there now a gaping opportunity?

HP would be considered by most to have been a company that targeted the professional end of the technology market and certainly their pedigree in servers, network infrastructure and managed solutions for business upheld this.

With their exit from the PC and mobile device marketplace the landscape of the technology marketplace will change.

Google, Apple and Microsoft are chasing the consumer

The Android, IOS and Windows 7 phone environments are all very heavily weighted toward the consumer market, this is clearly represented in the marketing of each of their offerings, so who is going to mop up the business market?

The business integration, replication and management tools that HP offered on the desktop have never really been delivered in the mobile environment and with no HP in the mix suddenly is there now a gap in the mobile marketplace for a professional mobile solution?

Examples of the types of functionality that are not fully catered for in the mobile world are centralised calendars and email systems, access to full mobile equivalents of desktop productivity tools and a professional data sharing and security model on an enterprise scale.

RIM Blackberry are probably the only company with a product that comes close to offering this functionality and yet they seem to be struggling to maintain market share against the major players.

Mobile marketplace: consumers in charge?

The irony is that with the emphasis on the consumer, the business needs may well be dropping down the priority list and if demand is not there then obviously suppliers won’t be keen to invest in a product. In fact it seems to me that even those in senior corporate roles seem to be making decisions on their mobile technology based on their needs as a consumer and not as a business person.

Mobile: is the gap widening or disappearing?

Will the focus on consumer needs extend this gap still further or perhaps the gap will disappear completely simply because there isn’t enough demand for a professionally focused mobile device. Only time will tell…

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Andrew Rayner is the Director and Founder of online marketing consultancy E-mphasis. Andrew’s expertise lies within the technological side of marketing, through utilising computers and the Internet to create the best office and business environments. He works closely with Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), claiming that this is no ‘black art’ – it takes appropriate applied skill and knowledge. He is highly regarded as an expert in the field of natural SEO and is regularly invited to speak on the topic at conferences and events. Andrew and the team at E-mphasis have pioneered an innovative use of Google Maps and online business listings to create highly targeted Local Internet Marketing strategies. Local Internet Marketing is a hugely untapped area of marketing strategy and one which is now beginning to generate interest and excitement from major UK retail brands.